peoplehood

May 11, 2021

How Sweet to Socialize Again

Hi there,

We’re excited to introduce you to some new faces (and some familiar, if you’ve been keeping up with this newsletter) created by Cacho Falcon. 

Cacho is a storyteller who listens deeply to every person he connects with — on the street, in the studio, and elsewhere — and helps them to express and interpret their vulnerabilities through his paintings. His art gives his subjects’ feelings new depth and form, and allows them to feel fully seen and understood during the time they spend together. As Peoplehood’s first artist-in-residence, he’s created a variety of characters to bring some of our tips, tools, and resources to life. Read on to view our latest collaboration, and let us know which of the below characters is your favorite @Peoplehood_!
 

Art is thought-provoking. It allows us to externalize our inner feelings, and process any emotions or issues we may be dealing with. Once we get those feelings out creatively, we’re better equipped to talk about them. This is how art helps us connect with one another. 

Art reflects more than an artist’s personal experiences; it reflects everything that’s happening in the world. Artists simply translate this into different forms, and rebirth it for everyone to see more clearly. Through creativity, we can help heal ourselves and each other. That’s why I find art to be such a beautiful and therapeutic medium for storytelling. 

— Cacho Falcon, Peoplehood Artist-in-Residence

What's Your Social Style?

The Myth: Introverts are quiet, socially awkward loners who hate parties and large gatherings. 

 

The Facts: Introverts recharge via alone time. They feel their best in calm, comfortable spaces where they can participate in the solitary activities they enjoy (journaling, reading, daydreaming, strolling, etc.). Introverts can feel especially overwhelmed in crowds and busy environments, and often prefer to socialize one-on-one or in very small groups. They may seem quiet or reserved due to their tendency to observe and deliberate before speaking, but they aren’t necessarily shy! Introverts are energized by their rich inner lives, and need a lot of “me time.”

The Myth: Extroverts never turn down an invitation to hang out, and can’t stand being home alone with no plans on a Saturday night — or any night. They act and speak before they think or reflect. 

 

The Facts: Social interaction is energizing for extroverts — they recharge when they engage with others, be they friends or strangers. Extroverts are most stimulated when in the company of others, and they can feel bored, tired, or antsy when spending too much time alone or in quiet, nonsocial environments. The art of conversation may seem intuitive to them; they feel in the zone when talking with and meeting new people. If you’re a person who regularly rallies your friends together for high-energy group adventures (big dinners, parties, concerts, events, etc.), you may be an extrovert! 

The Myth: Everyone’s an ambivert!

 

The Facts: Everyone has a combination of introverted and extroverted personality traits. We all have a social life and an inner life, and need human connection to thrive — but many people live in the middle of the introvert-extrovert spectrum. Ambiverts recharge via social interaction and alone time; whichever feels best for them on any given day is situational and based on their immediate circumstances. 

 

Need help figuring out your social style? Check out this quiz we love from TED. 

Personality Playlists

Introvert:

“Underneath the Stars” - Mariah Carey

“Misguided Ghosts” - Paramore

“Sunday” - Sia

 

Extrovert:

“Get Me Bodied” - Beyonce

“Come On Over” - Christina Aguilera

“Me Against the Music” - Britney Spears ft. Madonna

 

Ambivert:

“Pink Pony Club” - Chappell Roan

“Party in the U.S.A.” - Miley Cyrus

“Can’t Fight the Moonlight” Graham Stack Radio Edit - LeAnn Rimes

Articles We ❤️: 

The Coming Conflict Between Introverts and Extroverts, The Atlantic

The Paradox of Fleeting Relationships in Small Places, Psychology Today

The Everyday Objects That Got Us Through Lockdown, It’s Nice That